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7 Tire Swing Ideas And How To Make One Yourself

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Updated on June 6, 2022 by
tire swing ideas

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There is something so idyllic about incorporating a tire swing in your back or front yard for your children. Even if you never had one yourself as a kid, you can't help but want one to provide your child with endless hours of easy fun most days out of the year. Tire swings are more affordable than an actual swing set and they are typically fairly easy to make, no matter the style you plan to go with. These tire swing ideas and instructions on how to make one yourself will help you get started, but really, your kid will be the best test to know if you did it right.

While it might seem like there is only one way to make a tire swing, there are actually a few different ways to go about it and several different designs. At the end of the day, whether you make the swing vertical or horizontal, or paint it to look like your kid’s favorite animal, they will have hours of fun. You can also opt for either a chain or rope to attach the tire to your tree and either way, it will remain secure to hold your child as they swing back and forth.

But before you look at all of the possible tire swings to adorn your front or back yard, you should get familiar with the “how” of it all.

What is a Tire String

A tire string swing is a simple, but fun, swing that uses a tire as the main component. The tire is attached to a long piece of string and is swung back and forth by the child. This type of swing is great for smaller children as it is easy to move and doesn't require much strength to operate. The bottom of the tire is usually weighted so that it will stay in the air longer, providing your child with a longer ride.

The Average Household Income in the...
The Average Household Income in the United States

You can use an old tire, or you can purchase a new tire specifically for this type of swing. If you choose to use an old tire, be sure to remove the rubber from the inside of the tire so that the string doesn't get caught on it. The tree branch should also be long enough to accommodate the length of the tire.

If you want something a little more elaborate, consider building a playset-style tire swing. This type of swing is typically built from two pieces of wood that are attached at the top and bottom of the tire. The front and back of the playset are then attached to the tire using screws or nails. This type of swing is great for larger children as it offers more stability and is easier to move around.

In the tutorial below, you will learn how to make a simple tire swing using a couple of pieces of wood. You can do the heavy duty work yourself or you can buy a pre-made playset.

How To Make A DIY Tire Swing

Before you start to make your own tire swing, you will need the following supplies:

-A large tire

-An anchor bolt or a sturdy tree

-Tape measure

-Circular saw

-Spray paint and a sealant

-Ruler or a straight edge

-Jigsaw or a belt sander

-Pipe clamps

-Carabiner hook

-Drill bit

-1/2 inch hole saw

-Stiles (or boards) to attach the tire to the tree (optional)

-Wood screws and nails

-Swivel

-Nylon rope or polypropylene rope

-Washer bolt

Surprisingly, to make a simple tire swing, you only need a few tools. First, find a large used tire and clean it as thoroughly a you can. Even though it is for an outdoor swing, this is something your kids will sit in and sometimes hold onto. You will want to use soap and water on the inside as well as outside of the tire before continuing to the next steps. You might even want to use WD40 to cut through any residual grease.

Next, find the branch you want to hang the swing from. Ideally, it should be one that is thick and sturdy and stands at least nine feet above the ground. But even if it’s the highest branch you can find, make sure it is strong enough to withstand the pressure of a tire swing moving back and forth.

Get 50 feet of rope and drill drain holes in the tire. Then, use a ladder to secure the rope over your chosen branch and make sure it is as sturdy and secure as possible. Next, tie the rope around the tire in a same kind of secure loop that won't come undone. Preferably, a square knot or a bowline knot. And after you give it a quick test run, bring out your kids for the real test of how fun it is. The end of the rope should be hanging down below the branch, so they can grab onto it as they swing.

Once you have the tire swing set up, it is time to start painting it. Use a sealant to protect the wood from the elements and to keep the paint from chipping. You can use any color you like, but we recommend using a bright primary color and a darker secondary color.

Now is also a good time to cut out your swing design. We recommend using a circular saw and a straight edge to make your cuts. Make sure your measurements are precise, as this will be the only way to ensure that your swing is perfectly fitted to your tire.

After you have your design cut out, it is time to start assembling it. Start by attaching the side panels using screws and nails. Then, attach the front panel using screws and nails as well. Finally, attach the back panel using screws and nails. Make sure that all of your screws are hidden by the trim pieces you just installed.

Now it’s time to add the rope handle and swivel. Cut two pieces of nylon rope that are about 18 inches long each and screw them into place on either side of the swing’s back panel. Then, tie one end of each rope around an appropriate post on either side of the swing (or use a swivel). The drainage holes in the tire should now be usable. Insert a pipe clamp into one of the holes and use a drill bit to drill a 1/2 inch hole. Then, use a swivel to attach the other end of the pipe clamp to the swing. Now, you can hang your tire swing using the rope and pipe clamps.

And finally, tie each end of the ropes together in a knot or bowline knot. Fraying rope is one of the most common problems with tire swings, so it is important to keep them as safe as possible. To do this, we recommend using pipe clamps to attach the rope to the swing. Make sure that the clamps are tight, but not too tight, as this will damage the rope. The rope swing should now be ready for use! That’s it!

What to do with the excess rope?

It is advisable not to tie the rope too tightly to the tire. If it becomes too tight, it could cause the tire to puncture or break. Instead, use a simple knot or a bowline knot to keep it secure. And the more excess rope you have, the more swing you can create!

You can also use the excess rope to create a swing frame. This will help to keep the tire in place while in use and will also make it easier to move around. A swing frame is also a great way to add extra stability to the swing. This is a great project for kids to help with.

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Now that you know how to make a tire swing yourself, take a look at all of these other options, some of which take tire swing up to a whole other level.

1. Animal Tire Swing

This one changes things up by painting the actual tire to look like your kid’s favorite animal. And instead of keeping it vertical, you can turn it to a horizontal angle and attach chains to make it easier for more than one kid to ride on at once.

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2. Covered Tire Swing

To make this variation, you go by the standard instructions, but wrap a soft rope around the entire tire. This keeps it from getting too hot out in the summer sun and adds a little cushion too.

3. Horse Tire Swing

Unless you are already experienced with complicated DIY projects, this horse tire swing might be a little ambitious. Still, it’s a unique take on the classic tire swing and still requires the same tools to get it done.

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4. Criss-Cross Tire Swing

Although the blog where this tire swing idea originated from is in German, it’s easy to see how this was accomplished. You can thread soft rope or bungee cord in a pattern on the tire to provide a comfortable seat in the middle of the tire rather than an open hole.

5. Double Tire Swing

If you have more than one kid, you can go with this horizontal tire swing which places a smaller tire above the larger tire to provide two places for kids to sit as they swing back and forth together.

6. Chain Tire Swing

It’s a little more complicated to make this chain tire swing than a more standard rope tire swing, but it can also be more long lasting. Plus, with three anchored spots where the chain attached to the tire, it’s easy to balance on it.

7. Horizontal Rope Tire Swing

You don't need much more than rope, a few small pieces of wood, a drill, and a sturdy tire to make this swing for your little ones to enjoy outside. But instead of knotting the rope around the tire for a vertical swing, turn it horizontal and drill holes to attach the rope in three different points on top.

Making your own tire swing can be a hard and strenuous project, depending on which type you go with. But if you remind yourself that it is all in the name of giving your kid a memorable outdoor toy to last their childhood, it makes it all worth it in the end.

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Final Thoughts

A tire swing is a great way to have some fun outside and get some exercise at the same time. It is also a great way to get your children moving and enjoying themselves. You can make your own tire swing using simple materials that you likely already have in your home. These materials include a tire, some rope, and a few simple tools.

To put it simply, to make your tire swing, first take the tire and place it on a flat surface. Make sure that the tire is large enough so that it can support your weight. Then, tie the rope around the tire in a loop. Make sure that the loop is large enough so that you can swing the tire easily. Finally, use the tools that you have to make a simple frame out of wood or other sturdy material. Place the frame on top of the tire and make sure that it is securely attached.

It is important to note that your tire swing should be properly maintained in order to ensure that it lasts for a long time. Make sure to keep the rope clean and free of knots. Additionally, make sure to check the frame periodically for signs of wear and tear. If the frame is damaged, you will need to replace it before you can use your tire swing. Safety is always a top priority when it comes to swings, so make sure to keep your children safe while they are enjoying this fun activity.

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