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Is Motley Fool Tax Deductible

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Updated on April 16, 2023 by
Is Motley Fool Tax Deductible

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Investing is a crucial part of any person’s financial plan. But investing is not an easy task, as there are so many financial tools and techniques to choose from.

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When investing, you need to take care of many things like setting a goal for your investment portfolio, determining how much money you want to invest, determining which investments should yield the highest returns, and determining how long you should hold your investments for.

For many people, this means getting support from the right investment company or adviser. One such example is Motley Fool. But, is Motley Fool tax deductible? This article will tell you all you need to know.

What is Motley Fool?

Motley Fool is a company that provides investment advice and investment tools to help people invest. It provides different financial tools to help with advice on things like mutual funds, retirement plans, brokerage accounts, and many more. They also provide tools that help you make the best financial decisions.

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Special $89 Stock Advisor Introductory Offer for New Members

Stock Advisor Picks Returned >500%. If you give Stock Advisor a try and decide it’s not for you, simply cancel within 30 days and you’ll receive every penny of your membership fee back.

This service gives you all the pointers you need to make the best financial decisions and ensure you don’t make any financial mistakes, or at least as few as possible. Motley Fool is a great company for those new to investing or wanting to learn more about investing. They provide detailed investment information in an easy-to-understand way. Their financial tools and services will help you be more informed, helping you potentially get the best returns on your investments.

Is Motley Fool Tax Deductible

Is Motley Fool Deductible?

Most deductions for investment expenses are now eliminated with the passage of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017. Taxpayers used to be able to deduct investment fees, including IRA administration fees, from their taxes. This is because those expenses were counted as part of the miscellaneous itemized deductions category. However, this is no longer the case. Many items that were once considered to be deductible have now been repealed. Unfortunately, this includes Motley Fool subscriptions.

In other words, no, you cannot deduct Motley Fool subscriptions. This is because they are not deemed as part of the miscellaneous expenses that are legible as itemized deductions. Make sure to contact a tax advisor to confirm this.

How Motley Fool Can Help You

There are still some big investment expenses that are still deductible. These include interest payments and losses of capital on investments.

You can deduct the interest you paid on a taxable investment, such as a margin loan, when you borrowed money to make it. The amount that you can deduct is limited to the amount that you have earned from investments. It is possible to carry over this excess interest to future years. Of course, make sure you are comfortable with all of the risks of margin investing before doing so, as while gains are magnified, so are losses.

A capital loss occurs when you sell an investment to get less money for it. These losses allow you to offset any gains you may have made from selling assets.

Many of the investments that you used to be able to deduct are now no longer deductible, but you may still be able to write off a few of those expenses. This is something that the Motley Fool community may be able to help you with, or a trusted tax advisor.

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